Arboreal Wisdom

April, 2021








Joyful Advice from a Smart Tree


April is National Poetry Month. It’s time to celebrate words artfully strung together by poets far and wide!


One of the highlights of the inaugural festivities in January of this year was hearing Amanda Gorman recite her amazing poem, “The Hill We Climb.” As tears rolled down my cheeks, I watched Amanda captivate the nation with inspiring and motivating words. I don’t think I was the only person entirely mesmerized by both her craft and performance. I was reminded that poetry is meant to be read out loud!


My invitation to you, this month, is to read the following poem out loud to someone you love (which could be yourself!), or someone who is afraid, daunted, down, grief-stricken . . . in other words, share it with anyone! And as you recite the words of wisdom embedded in this poem, take note of the effect this has on you as well as your listener. Scroll down a bit for the poem by Ilan Shamir.



















Advice from a Tree


Dear Friend, Stand Tall and Proud Sink your roots deeply into the Earth Reflect the light of a greater source Think long term Go out on a limb Remember your place among all living beings Embrace with joy the changing seasons For each yields its own abundance The Energy and Birth of Spring The Growth and Contentment of Summer The Wisdom to let go of leaves in the Fall The Rest and Quiet Renewal of Winter Feel the wind and the sun And delight in their presence Look up at the moon that shines down upon you And the mystery of the stars at night. Seek nourishment from the good things in life Simple pleasures Earth, fresh air, light Be content with your natural beauty Drink plenty of water Let your limbs sway and dance in the breezes Be flexible Remember your roots Enjoy the view!

~ Ilan Shamir



Where did this poem take you? If you feel like it, please share in the comments below!


If you want to read a poem every day this month, try The Writers Almanac or Poetry Foundation's Poem of the Day (and there are plenty of others).


I wish I could highlight a number of poets whose exquisite books of poetry are available to purchase but there are too many, and I haven't the time. Perhaps next April! In the meantime, check out Saved By a Poem: The Transformative Power of Words by Kim Rosen.


Comments on this blog post are welcome — see the bottom of this page. No need to log in, just type your comments in the box, and press "Comment." Your comments will appear pending moderator approval.

Prompts For Joy


Click here to relish Amanda Gorman’s poem, “The Hill We Climb,” performed at the 2021 Presidential Inauguration.


Click here for a performance of Naomi Shihab Nye’s poem, “Kindness.”


Click here for all previous Prompts for Joy.


Announcements:



Why Assemble a Life? An Interview with Author and Artist, Martha Clark Scala


What motivated me to write Assembling a Life: Claiming the Artist in My Father (and Myself)? Check out this video to find out. Comments and feedback welcome!


Pictured Above


Top: Universal Tree. Collage by Martha Clark Scala.


Below: A sample page from Chapter 19 in my memoir, Assembling a Life: Claiming the Artist in My Father (and Myself).


Praise for Assembling a Life: Claiming the Artist in My Father (and Myself) by Martha Clark Scala



"There is a healing you offered not only to yourself but also to one reader —me — and I’m sure many others . . . in watching the unfolding of your history. Watching you so intimately tell the in-depth story is brave and inspiring."

~ Anonymous Reader


Sample page from Chapter 19. This memoir is loaded with color photos (and some black and white) on just about every page. A visual feast.


To purchase the premium softcover or e-book versions of Assembling a Life, click here.







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